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Photo Credit: Doree Weller

Photo Credit: Doree Weller

Every once in awhile, I just feel GOOD, for no real reason, as if everything were right with the world.  I had one of those nights recently.  The husband and I had gotten quite a bit done during the day, cleared off some projects that needed to be done.   Afterwards, my brother and I hiked 3 miles in 106 degrees.  We had some yummy Indian curry afterward.  When I got home, I made myself some lemonade with juice I’d frozen from my trees.  I lounged in the bathtub with a good book, and as I got out and started drying out, it struck me that I just felt really good, as if everything were all right with the world.

Of course, no sooner did I think that than the dog started barking as if someone were breaking into the house.  No one was, of course.  It was the wind and rumbling thunder that upset her.  Still, I didn’t know that for a minute, and my heart got quite the workout.

When I settled back down and discovered what got her going, I realized that I still felt good.

Do you have those times too, for no reason at all?

When I first started this a few weeks ago, I have to admit that it took me some time to find positive news stories.  I consider myself to be pretty good at focusing on the positive, but since I’ve started this, the positive news stories are easier to find.  Since I don’t really believe that the world has become a more positive place, I have to believe that the change must be in me.  That as I always tell people, when you change your focus, you change what you see.

Police officer rescues “aggressive” dog.

Restaurant finds a solution to food waste.

Paralyzed dogs play fetch. 

There’s a real life Darth Vader Corvette!

There’s your good news for the week.

“In all of living, have much fun and laughter. Life is to be enjoyed, not just endured.”
― Gordon B. Hinckley

I wrote this post in 2011, and thought it was high time that I reposted it.  So for throwback Thursday… Letter to My 16 Year Old Self... Enjoy.

Desert Botanical Gardens Phoenix AZ Photo Credit: Doree Weller

Desert Botanical Gardens
Phoenix AZ
Photo Credit: Doree Weller

I recently read an article in which a woman wrote about going to Disneyland alone.  She really wanted to go and no one wanted to go with her, so she hemmed and hawed about it until she finally decided to go.

What’s the deal with not wanting to do things solo?  I’ve never understood why people would feel weird about eating out alone, going to the movies alone, or go to the bathroom alone (that’s a girls’ only thing… I hope).  I love spending time alone.  In fact, I often dream about going on vacation in a nice cabin in the woods… and then I realize that I’d creep myself out with everything I’d imagine lurking in the woods, waiting to eat me.  And that dream dissolves and dies.

But in all seriousness, I don’t mind doing things alone.  It gives me time to be introspective, to read, to write, to observe.  Going to an amusement park alone might be weird for me, since I’m not social.  If you’re someone who enjoys talking to strangers in line, I could see how it would be cool.  Then again, if I were doing it, I’d probably just bring a book and be just fine.  There’d be no negotiating what ride to go on, and no one saying they were tired.  Actually, it does sound pretty good.

Is there anything you don’t like doing alone?  Or something you especially do like doing alone?

Desert Botanical Gardens Phoenix AZ Photo Credit: Doree Weller

Desert Botanical Gardens
Phoenix AZ
Photo Credit: Doree Weller

Someone yesterday told me that she feels lonely even when she’s around other people.  She then told me about a video she’d seen that described exactly how she feels.  Look Up is an incredibly powerful poem/ video about how we’ve allowed technology to isolate us.

About 6 months ago, I was out to dinner with my husband.  He was doing something on his phone, and I looked around at other couples in the restaurant.  They were sitting together and on their phones.  I go out to dinner with friends, and they say they want to see me, but then spend a lot of time checking their phones or checking in on Facebook or taking pictures of their dinner.

Technology was not meant to isolate us.  At its best, it’s a tool that can make all of our lives easier.  I have information at my fingertips.  I can carry photos with me without having those plastic things in my wallet.  (Side note: do kids exchange school pictures anymore, writing notes on the back?)

We don’t experience things firsthand anymore.  We experience them through a camera.  It’s as if things aren’t real until we check in on Facebook, tweet about it, or Instagram it. Facebook has become the new journal.  Instead of writing down private thoughts, we put everything out there.  The information is there, but it becomes virtually meaningless.  There’s no filter as to what’s important and what’s not.  It all takes on a false importance that renders everything unimportant.

Maybe I won’t remember every detail of my trip if I don’t use “social” media, but maybe I’ll enjoy it more.  Feel more about it.  Relax more.  Have private jokes to share with just one person.  We don’t connect with strangers in line anymore, because we’re too busy texting or checking Facebook.  Then, if we fall, we wonder why no stranger stops to help us up.  Why should they?  They haven’t connected with us, and it’s everyone’s fault.  Yours, mine, theirs.  If you feel lonely, and you’re on your phone or other device in public, I challenge you to put it down and smile at a stranger.  They might look away.  They might glare at you.  Because we don’t do that anymore.  But change doesn’t happen overnight, and if you want to see change in the world, IT HAS TO START WITH YOU.

So, if this video touched you or anything I’ve said strikes a chord with you, please be aware of how you’re using technology.  Look up from your phone or iPad and be in the world for a minute.  Don’t check in; don’t upload pictures of your food.  Have a journal or a notebook instead of a Facebook.  Just be in the moment.  And see what happens.

I found some really good ones this week.  Take a minute and enjoy them.  Trust me, they’re worth taking the time to read and watch.

Lowe’s employees help a disabled vet.

Singer Colby Caillat is tired of being photoshopped.  This video really touched me.

Police officers buy groceries for a family in need.

Friskies releases “Cats of Summer,” a cute music video.  More importantly, they’ll donate food to homeless cats for every link click.

That’s all for this week.  Have a great weekend!

“Be happy for this moment. This moment is your life.”
-Omar Khayyam

 

IMG_1833Dear Furbabies,

I just read an article on Facebook that really hurt me.  It was about a dog who had been shot for no reason, by a stranger.  His parents took him to the vet, went outside to discuss the cost of surgery, and never returned.  I presume they couldn’t or didn’t want to afford the cost of surgery, but I just can’t imagine leaving any one of you to wonder if I were going to return.  I’d never do that.  When I bring you home, it’s forever, for better or worse, and I mean it 100%.

I know that I’m your whole world.  I know that because I see the way you look at me, the way you greet me at the door when I come home.  The way you snuggle against me, or nudge my hand when I’m not paying close enough attention to you.  I know that I’m your only source of food and water, but what you want from me more than those basics is my love and attention.  Sometimes I get busy or stressed and don’t think about it the way I should.  I’m sorry for that.  It doesn’t mean that I love you less; it just means that I’m human: selfish and flawed.

Even if I don’t always give you enough attention or playtime, I promise you that I love you and will never leave you behind.  I’d rather live with you in a cardboard box than alone in a mansion.  I’ll be with you until the end.  I’ll make the hard decisions when I have to, because that’s what I took on when I brought you home.  Whenever that time comes, I take comfort in knowing that you, and all the ones who’ve gone before, will be waiting at the Rainbow Bridge.

It doesn’t matter what happens: there will always be room for you in my life.  That’s a promise.

IMG_8403

Phoenix Art Museum Photo Credit: Doree Weller

Phoenix Art Museum
Photo Credit: Doree Weller

As I was drifting on the edge of sleep last night, I had a random thought, as I sometimes do, and I wrote it down so I wouldn’t forget it.

In books and movies (good ones, at least), first words in a relationship are important.  They set the tone for the relationship going forward.  In Harry Potter, Hermione’s first words to Harry and Ron were, “Has anyone seen a toad?  Neville’s lost one.”  She sounded bossy, and was taking charge, even then.

But in real life, we don’t bookmark moments, and they often pass by with little notice.  I remember how I met my oldest friend; we were 6, and her finger was slammed in the desk by another girl.  I imagine my first words were something like, “Are you okay?”  I remember being attracted to my husband because he wanted “an interesting woman,” but I don’t remember how I decided he was interesting in those early days.  I remember that we talked for hours but don’t remember what either of us said.

But as to the rest of my friendships, I remember very little about their beginnings, because in early days, those relationships aren’t important, and by the time they are, those early days have become blurry.  The most important moments in life are usually only important in retrospect.

That’s probably why conversation is so hard to write; most conversations are nothing profound.  I’ve tried to listen to my conversations with others, but the problem is that if I’m listening to them, I’m not in them.  Conversation often blurs around the edges too, in retrospect.

In writing, it’s hard to make conversation sound real, because if it’s really realistic, then it’s pretty boring.  Think about it.  Most conversations are pretty boring.  The Fault in Our Stars by John Green has some of the best conversations I’ve seen in any book, but I wouldn’t exactly call it realistic.  The teens are too witty and without the missteps and awkwardness of real conversations.

Lucky for me, I’m care more about entertaining and being entertained than I do about whether or not something is “realistic.”  Still, wouldn’t it be interesting if we could rewind life, not to change, but just to see?  “Oh yeah, I remember now!”

Mystery Castle, Phoenix AZ Photo Credit: RJS Photos

Mystery Castle, Phoenix AZ
Photo Credit: RJS Photos

I’m not very good at letting go when I don’t have to.  I’m good with action, and if I’m forced into a situation, I can get through it.  But if I don’t have to, it’s hard, and I don’t like it.

My husband got an awesome new job, which means in the next month and a half, I’m moving from Phoenix, Arizona, to Austin, Texas.  I’ve been to Austin exactly once now, in a whirlwind house hunting trip that mostly left me with the impression of a lot of green.  Before that, I’d never actually been to Austin, but people keep telling me it’s a great place to live.  I love the fact that the city slogan is “Keep Austin Weird!”  I’m not excited about the humidity.

The move is going to be good for both of us.  I’m a firm believer in the idea that life is a series of adventures, and this is a pretty cool one.  I have a lot of loss ahead of me.  I have to leave my awesomely cool backyard, my friends (though I’ll keep in touch with them), my job, restaurants I eat in and grocery stores I shop in.

When we moved here 7 years ago, we moved fast, and we brought with us a lot of things that we haven’t used since then.  I’m ashamed to admit that I haven’t even finished unpacking everything.  So, in an effort to be more efficient this time around, I’ve been trying to get rid of a few things.  Like the Gamecube I haven’t touched in all that time, or the PS2 that’s been gathering dust.  I sold them on eBay, and as I’m packing them up, I’m sad to see them go.

I’m not sure why those things cause me to feel the tug of nostalgia.  I obviously didn’t think about them for long periods of time, but somehow they feel more important than they are. A lot of things in life are like that.  We have no use for them and don’t want them until we try to let them go.  Then suddenly, they become bigger than they are, and we feel as if we want and need them.

I feel better when I let go of the clutter in my life, when I rid myself of things I don’t need anymore.  I’m trying to make an effort to do more of it.

What clutter is holding you back in your life?

Yes, I realize that this isn’t seasonally appropriate, but deal with it.  And anyway, I’m talking about the movie, not the actual holiday.

I always liked the movie Groundhog Day.  I know that it would be torture for some people, but I like the idea of doing a day over and over again until you get it right.  You’d have lots of times to do things like read every book in the library, explore everything in the town, and get to know everybody.  It would almost be like narrating a book because I could eventually see everything from different angles.

Every day could be the weekend until I tired of that, and then days could be productive, until I tired of that.  I’d know the rhythm of the days, so I’d never get an unexpected flat tire, or a spider in my shoe.

What do you think about living one day over and over?

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